There’s no doubt that the way in which teams are managed have changed significantly over the last few years. Once upon a time the hardline approach was favored, in a move that was theoretically named Theory X. Now, the Theory Y method is much more commonplace; in other words, teams are given more leeway to express themselves.

Of course, there are a number of other ways that managers can maintain a happy team. This is the reason behind today’s post, and we will now take a look at some of the things that you can do to preach this.

Team building days aren’t just a gimmick

Let’s start with team building days. Once upon a time they might have had something of a debatable reputation associated with them. Now, this is all changing, and one only has to look at these team building events in London to see that these are completely varied.

This isn’t simply “a day off work”, as they were sometimes viewed. Now, it is seen as a constructive way for team members to get to know each other better. This is something that should not be understated either; particularly in larger companies where some employees will never interact with others. It means that these days out are a great way to reward employees, but indirectly boost productivity as well.

Knowledge is power

It’s a cliché, we know, but one really can’t discount the power of knowledge. Nowadays, companies are investing more in their in-house training programs, and it’s for good reasons. Not only does it shrink the cost of hiring employees (they care more likely to be promoted from within) but it gives people a sense of empowerment. Their CV suddenly looks a lot stronger and they appreciate what the company is trying to do for them.

Involve them in the decision-making process

You might have the final say on decisions, but by at least including your workforce in some can give them a huge confidence boost and make them feel more part of your company.

Interestingly, a study was conducted by Seers some years ago which highlighted how important “feeling involved” was for motivation levels. It was ranked higher than things like monetary rewards and flexible working, which perhaps tell its own story.

Make time for regular catch ups

While you shouldn’t commit to an endless amount of discussions with your team, let’s make no mistake that these are crucially important for your relationship with them.

Sure, we are now in an era where working with autonomy is fashionable, but at the same time you do need to regularly catch up and discuss an employee’s area of work. This isn’t necessarily to see if they have been working on what they should have been, but more so to make sure that they are working without any concerns. These regular catch ups can mean that your employees know that they will have a chance to voice any problems that might be blighting their work, and ultimately make them a happier worker.

4 ways to improve morale in your team